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15 Little Things to Remember to Pack for Your Big RV Trip

Here’s a list of little things to remember that make a big difference on the road.

Sometimes the smallest things are the most important! 

A tool kit, water filter, and portable speaker that can fit in your hand. They may not sound like they have something in common, but they do. 

They are important, albeit small, items that you will not want to miss on your next trip!

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15 Little Things to Remember Before You Hit the Road

little things to remember
Sometimes it’s the little things to remember to make the RV trip great!

In the RV Lifestyle Facebook group, one of our followers is completing an RV build to take a great family trip soon. He asked our followers for advice on the “little things” he should take with him on the trip. 

He received a lot of great input, and I thought it would make for a very useful post. So here it is! 

I have written in the past about 7 must-haves for your first RV trip. However, I am expanding on that post to include these other “small things” the group recommended.  

Just because something is small does not mean it is not important. In order to remember all the things you need for your next camping excursion, you may want to keep a checklist. 

The following are important items that you can add to your list!

1. Basic Tool Box

It is always a good idea to have a small tool kit on hand in your RV. You never know when you might need a screwdriver or wrench or to hit something with a hammer! What are the little things to remember to put in your RV toolbox?

This is definitely one of those things you’ll kick yourself for not having if you end up needing it. 

2. RV Surge Protector

Protect your RV from electrical threats with a surge protector. That way a power surge or low voltage issues will not cause harm to your rig’s electrical system. 

This small investment can save your whole electrical system!

Our RV has a surge protector built-in. If yours doesn’t, I recommend you get one to go between the power cord and the pedestal. In older campgrounds, there are a lot of pedestals with bad connections that can damage tur RV’s electrical system and your appliances.

We can recommend the Southwire Surge Guard, model 34930.

When you plug in the other end of the cord to the shore connector on the RV, lock it in place. With ours, it’s a turn to the right. We also have a locking wheel on the plug to make it seven more secure.

 See this video for an example.

3. Water Pressure Regulator

You do not want your RV’s water system to get damaged or spring a leak! That is why you want to look into a good water pressure regulator for your RV. 

It’s an $8 part that will save your plumbing system.

4. Water Filter

Having an RV water filter ensures that you have clean, safe drinking water. A water filtration system cleans out the gross gunk in many campground water hookup systems. 

5. Foldable Rake

This little item can be very useful. You never know what the ground cover will be like when camping. Use a rake to even it out.  

You can also use a foldable rake to put out a fire, clear out a sitting area, or make your trailer more level. 

6. Portable Air Compressor

little things to remember tires
Be prepared.

The last thing you want is to be stranded somewhere with a flat tire. Especially if you are going to be far away from services! 

A portable air compressor can pump up your tires if needed to get you out of a jam. It can also help keep your tires properly inflated to ensure they have a longer life. 

A nifty trick is to use your air compressor to “dust off” picnic tables, BBQs, and other campground fixtures.

7. Portable Speaker

Okay, a portable speaker might not be a “must-have.” But it sure can make your trip better! If you like music, that is. 

Some portable speakers are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. But they still produce a great (and loud!) sound. 

If you enjoy listening to music when traveling, I highly recommend bringing along a small speaker that does not take up a lot of space. 

While it is always excellent to hear the sounds of nature, it is also great to hear some good tunes once in a while. 

Just be sure to respect your neighbors!

Living the RV Lifestyle?

8. Road Atlas: Digital or Non-Digital

This does not necessarily have to be a hard copy road atlas. There are GPS systems and GPS apps that allow you to look up routes ahead of time and download them to your phone. That way, you can still access them even when you do not have cell service. 

In addition, you may want to consider getting a Low Clearance Early Detection System. This is especially helpful (and safer!) for large RVs. It helps you navigate around bridges and other hazards that are too low for your vehicle to clear. 

9. White Noise Machine

little things to remember white noise
Will the new sounds keep you up?

I know this may seem like an odd item to add to the list. But it can be very helpful to some folks! 

When camping, it may be hard to fall asleep at night or take an afternoon nap. That is because you hear unique noises, and are in a different environment than you are used to. Especially if you are traveling around a lot! 

A white noise machine can help you drown out foreign noises and lull you to sleep. It can also help keep you asleep once you finally nod off. 

If you are a light sleeper, a white noise machine may be worth considering for your next trip. 

10. Long Jumper Cables

Do not risk being stranded with a dead battery and no jumper cables. Or ones that are too short to reach your RV’s engine. 

Another thing to consider is a jumper starter that can jump-start a rig without needing another vehicle. This may be a good idea for you boondockers out there!

11. Emergency Radio

little things to remember weather
Remember the weather!

An emergency radio can help you stay in touch with the NOAA Emergency Radio Station in the event of a natural disaster or emergency. They can help you identify fire danger or recovery information for other natural disasters. 

All in all, it can help keep you and your family safe. 

12. Extension Ladder or Foldable Stool

You never know when you might need to reach great heights, like the roof of your rig, when traveling. Having an extension ladder, or at least a foldable stool, can help give you a boost when you need it. 

13. Welding Gloves

As odd as this may sound, welding gloves can be used in a number of situations. They come in handy by the campfire for moving wood around. They’re also great for handling your generator.

In addition to protecting your hands from heat, they can protect your fingers while clearing your site of debris or carrying things with sharp edges.

14. Truck & RV Fuel Stations App

There are lots of helpful apps for RVers, including ones to find propane and fuel stations when out on the road. It provides the address and freeway exit of each fuel station. 

That way you can determine when and where to stop. 

15. Duct Tape

You probably already know that duct tape can come in very handy around the home. It is no different when you are in your RV! As one person in our community said, If it moves and it shouldn’t use duct tape. 

Use it to temporarily repair frayed wires, holes or leaks, or hang up holiday decorations. The uses are endless with good ol’ duct tape!

Add to the Conversation! What are your little things to remember?

There are lots of little things to remember and I know we didn’t cover them all. So please share your suggestions in the comments below.

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26 Responses to “15 Little Things to Remember to Pack for Your Big RV Trip”

November 13, 2021at10:45 pm, Lyes Benarbane said:

Now, this, this is a good introduction to the sublime joys of a life on the road

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November 13, 2021at10:08 pm, Susan Lane said:

That’s a really good and helpful checklist! Thanks for the article!

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November 13, 2021at8:04 am, Kelly Freeman said:

On an RV trip, I always bring my six kiddos!

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November 11, 2021at10:58 am, Theresa Jenkins said:

…now that we are getting old…portable power is something to have

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November 08, 2021at10:36 am, Pamela Snyder said:

So helpful..just when you think you’re ready..there is one more thing!!

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November 08, 2021at10:36 am, Sheila Majka said:

Cell phone chargers , a correct.tire pressure gauge

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November 04, 2021at7:25 am, Lynn said:

Always such helpful information! Thanks for sharing!!

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November 03, 2021at11:33 pm, Jennifer Davis said:

I would bring a first aid kit, batteries, a notebook with important numbers & an emergency kit.

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November 03, 2021at9:14 pm, Jeannie said:

Wipes – lots and lots of wipes

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November 03, 2021at8:47 am, E Pennock said:

We keep a pair of needle nose pliers in the glove box

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November 03, 2021at8:19 am, Mark Clifford said:

My wife and myself, both, have LED headlamps that we always bring when camping. They are great for outside, in the dark, emergency repairs when you need two hands, and for inside in closed-in areas. Also, we have used them when walking back to our campsite in the dark, they are better for us than a hand-held flashlight.

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November 03, 2021at7:58 am, Mike said:

Campfire starting items… kindling, cardboard/paper, matches, in a waterproof container in an outside compartment.

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November 03, 2021at4:57 am, Geri said:

Electrolyte drink mixes (individual ones). They sure help on the road.

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November 02, 2021at7:46 pm, Dana said:

Keep debating if this lifestyle is something I’d enjoy. Will try a few places in-state to see

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November 02, 2021at7:30 pm, Betsy said:

Such handy tips. I learned a lot!

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November 02, 2021at1:30 pm, Thomas P said:

A mobile hotspot cellular amplifier. Had one in the house until new antenna went up nearby – it’s great for grabbing signals in the wilderness as well.

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November 02, 2021at9:12 am, Kari B said:

Great list! I love the idea of bringing a foldable rake.

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November 02, 2021at7:37 am, Peter M. said:

Great List!

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November 01, 2021at9:53 pm, Bill Robbins said:

Don’t forget flashlights, weather radio, emergency warning lights.

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November 01, 2021at6:38 pm, heather miller said:

A lot of great information

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November 01, 2021at4:28 pm, Susan Smith said:

Wipes (cleaning, flushable, facial, and/or baby) are essential for us and especially if we end up boondocking. They are ready to go when we are!

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November 01, 2021at2:14 pm, Ashley said:

Cozy clothes and strong coffee!

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November 01, 2021at1:49 pm, Dee Powell said:

The things I forgot on my first couple trips was dish soap and hand soap. I had paper plates but I couldn’t wash my pots and pans till I got home…:)

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November 01, 2021at10:00 am, Nancy Regan said:

My must have is a rechargeable motion-activated night light for when I get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, I don’t stumble around in the dark.

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November 01, 2021at9:31 am, Ron Lewen said:

Coffee!

Don’t ask me how I know 😀

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October 22, 2021at1:41 pm, Chuck said:

Under tools…A ratcheting screwdriver and at least two of every size Robertson bit if your RV is made in Canada.

Reply

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