Women RVers Share their Secret Tips for Successful Solo RV Travel

 Women RVers Share their Secret Tips for Successful Solo RV Travel

While solo RV travel is a liberating feeling, women RVers say it can also lead to lonely and trying times. Here's how to thrive with solo RV travel.

If you arm yourself with the right information and adequately prepare, you can enjoy your time on the road with little anxiety.

Some estimates say as many as a third of all RVers out there on the roads are solo women RVers.

Today, we will discuss tips about solo RV travel. Though particularly addressed to women Rvers, these tips apply to men, too. The information you will read is compiled from things I’ve learned from personal experience or interviewing women RVers we’ve met during campouts. We will cover the basics, such as safety and repairs. Then, dig deeper to look at ways to combat loneliness, connecting with communities, and so on.

Let me start with this video in which I interview lots of women RVers about solo RV travel:

Safety for RV solo travel 

The first question that I and most RVers, especially those who boondock, receive from others is “are you scared?” The truth is you can ask pretty much anyone who does this regularly, and they will tell you they are not scared. Bad things can happen anywhere, whether at home or on the road. The best thing you can do is be prepared and always listen to your gut!

Women RVers Share their Secret Tips for Successful Solo RV Travel 1
Laura Robinson enjoys solo RV travel and exploring North America. That's her kayaking the Swanee River in Florida.

Mike sat down with Laura Robinson for a podcast interview about the topic, and she provided some excellent tips for traveling as a solo RVer:

  • Always let someone know where you’ll be, and check-in with them regularly.
  • Carry the proper equipment such as:
    • Internet boosters for remote areas
    • Satellite phones, cell phones, laptops, etc.
    • Emergency tracker if you’re going very remote.
    • Bear spray
  • Women can invest in a large pair of men’s work boots to leave by the door to act as a deterrent.
  • Travel with a dog
  • Check in with the camp host (if there is one)
  • Make friends with the neighbors if they look like reputable people
  • Research the area you’ll be in
  • Always lock your door
  • Carry a gun if you are trained, licensed, and feel you need one.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings, and know when to leave!

The best thing you can do is develop a solid security plan, which will help you quickly react to various situations. Remember, you always have the horn you can use if you’re near others and need to draw attention. Also, be prepared to drive away, even if it means leaving gear behind. After all, your safety is more important than replaceable items.

image about women rvers
There are so many women RVers out there who thrive with solo rv travel

Maintenance and Repairs for RVing Women

Since an RV is a type of vehicle, you can expect to run into technical problems and required maintenance tasks. For example, Lisa Gruner mentioned, your RV may require diesel exhaust fuel and oil, and you need to learn how to check and fill if you don’t already know.

Here’s a list of tips for making maintenance and repairs easier for a solo RVer:

  • Know how to fully operate your RV, from driving it properly to backing up and checking various systems such as electrical and the engine.
  • Keep repair information accessible, and know who you’ll call if the repair is out of your hands.
  • Learn how to properly set up and tear down your camp
  • Consider a membership to a roadside assistance company such as AARP or AAA.
  • Know how to fill the tanks, and track how much water you have at any given point.

Combating Loneliness for solo RV travel

Women RVers Share their Secret Tips for Successful Solo RV Travel 2
Women RVers and those doing solo RV travel have lots of tips on how to avoid loneliness

Women seem to be more susceptible to loneliness than men, though it doesn’t affect everyone. As Carolyn from Carolyn’s RV Life mentioned, she loves being alone and doesn’t have loneliness issues. While this works for her, it may not be true for you. Just because you are a solo RV woman doesn’t mean you have to stay alone.

Here's a video interview Mike did with Carolyn about solo RV travel:

There are many groups and communities you can become a part of. Here are some tips to keep you from being so lonely:

  • Join groups on Facebook and other social media sites. Even though the interaction won’t be in person, it will still help feel connected to other people.
  • If you have a family at home and love RVing so much that you do it alone, then customize the trip just for you. 
  • Make friends wherever you can. Regardless if it’s a fellow camper at a gas station, a campground, on public land, or wherever you may be. This will help to grow your network and make lifelong friends.
  • Join RV groups that travel together. This can provide wonderful opportunities to partake in events that you wouldn’t typically want to do alone such as night hikes, kayaking, etc. Check out sites such as RVing Women, Solo Net, and Roadtrek International Solos. Each of these will connect you with other like-minded women who also RV solo.
  • Travel with a dog. Not only is a dog great company, but they can also alert you when something’s not quite right. Many solo women RVers like to travel with large dogs because they are a good deterrent for those up to no good, but a small dog can alert you. So, any type of dog is great to bring along!

Is the Solo RV Travel Life for You?

Some of you may be considering solo RV travel, but still unsure if it’s right for you.

As most women RVers would agree, you’ll have the best time of your life. Solo RV travel gives you the freedom to go wherever you want, whenever you want. You get to see new things and places you’ve always wanted to, without being held back by the idea you can’t do it alone. You can do it alone, and love it!

 Yet still, the solo RV life isn’t for everyone. As Carolyn said, it’s a question you must find the answer to within yourself. Consider if you are already at home alone, what’s the difference if you’re on the road alone? At least on the road, you’re provided with opportunities to make new friends and see the country. At the very least, you can give it a try. If you decide you don’t like it, you can always go back home.

What are your thoughts? Do you have any additional tips to share that will help women RVers? What about the experiences you’d like to share about solo RV travel you’ve done? Leave us a comment below; we’d love to chat with you!

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Women RVers Share their Secret Tips for Successful Solo RV Travel

Jennifer Wendland

Jennifer Wendland travels North America with husband, Mike, in a small Motorhome. She has worked with Mike as a television producer and traveled extensively all over the world. She is a self-described "gym rat," enjoying fitness and exercise wherever she goes. She is a certified Water Aerobics instructor and has taught large group classes in leading health clubs for more than 20 years. She and Mike have three grown children and seven grandchildren. They travel about two weeks out of every month. When not on the road, they live in southeastern Michigan.

4 Comments

  • I LOVE to hear stories of fellow women on the road.

    I got my 26′ Minnie Winnie July 2020 and I’ve been out a total of a month off and on. My plan is to full time it but Covid, settling personal stuff and buying and learning to ride a motorcycle I keep with my on the back of my RV has stalled my plans for full-time. But I’m slowly getting there!

    I’m looking forward to meeting fellow RVers!

    ~Allie

  • How many men do you know who leave their boots outside of the RV? I don’t know any. So, instead, I set up 2 folding chairs outside so it looks like there are two people inside. Also, I am a member of Loners on Wheels with chapters all over the country where I can meet friends and make new friends, and other solo groups like the Escapees Solos, WINS (wandering individuals network), etc. for socializing, sharing information, etc. , etc. We have a whole network out there.

  • Thank you for the information of women solo RVing. I’m in the process of looking to buy a small RV (24’ – 26’). It’s really important to know that there’s a group of women that camps and do it full-time. I’m thinking of being a traveling CNA and live in a RV to see this beautiful country called the United States of America.

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